Tuesday, August 13, 2013

Christianity Has The Strongest Possible Resource for Practicing Sacrificial Service, Generosity, And Peace-Making

 The Greco-Roman world‘s religious views were open and seemingly tolerant — everyone had his or her own god. The practices of the culture were quite brutal, however. The Greco-Roman world was highly stratified economically, with a huge distance between the rich and poor. By contrast, Christians insisted that there was only one true God, the dying Saviour Jesus Christ. Their lives and practices were, however, remarkably welcoming to those that the culture marginalised. The early Christians mixed people from different races and classes in ways that seemed scandalous to those around them. The Greco-Roman world tended to despise the poor, but Christians gave generously not only to their own poor but to those of other faiths. In broader society, women had very low status, being subjected to high levels of female infanticide, forced marriages, and lack of economic equality. Christianity afforded women much greater security and equality than had previously existed in the ancient classical world. During the terrible urban plagues of the first two centuries, Christians cared for all the sick and dying in the city, often at the cost of their lives.  
Why would such an exclusive belief system lead to behavior that was so open to others? It was because Christians had within their belief system the strongest possible resource for practicing sacrificial service, generosity, and peace-making. At the very heart of their view of reality was a man who died for his enemies, praying for their forgiveness. Reflection on this could only lead to a radically different way of dealing with those who were different from them. It meant they could not act in violence and oppression toward their opponents.  
We cannot skip lightly over the fact that there have been injustices done by the church in the name of Christ, yet who can deny that the force of Christians‘ most fundamental beliefs can be a powerful impetus for peace-making in our troubled world?

1 comment:

Thesauros said...

I'm always impressed with Keller's insight and desire to follow the intent of God's commands.

As a retired marriage counsellor, I believe, I live, and I teach that as the spiritual head of the home, the husband models for the family:
and so on.

Any woman who is married to a man who heeds Jesus' command to "Follow Me, be like me, behave in your relationships like I behaved in My relationships," has it light-years better than a woman in any other relationship.